Bugatti Divo; sold out…

Bugatti Divo

Bugatti Divo

So why the Divo?

“When I took up my position at Bugatti at the beginning of the year, I soon learnt that our customers and fans were waiting for a special vehicle which would tell a further story for the brand in addition to the Chiron,” said Stephan Winkelmann, President of Bugatti Automobiles S.A.S. “The Bugatti team was also very eager to implement a project like this.”  It was therefore decided to build a super sports car with a different character from the Chiron which would still be immediately recognizable as a Bugatti.

Bugatti Divo

Bugatti Divo

So if you’re pondering Divo vs Veyron, it comes down to curves or straight-line zip. Winkelmann goes on to say, “The Divo has significantly higher performance in terms of lateral acceleration, agility and cornering. The Divo is made for corners. ”Sophisticated aerodynamics programme, modifications to chassis and suspension as well as weight reduction make the Divo a star performer… at… 77 lbs lighter than the Chiron…with a much higher lateral acceleration of 1.6 g”.  (Porsche 918 1.12 g, Ferrari LaFerrari 1.16 g)

Bugatti Divo

Just who buys a Bugatti?

Bugatti describes owners as “extraordinary people” and “not standard car enthusiasts.”  On average they own “64 cars, 3 jets, 3 helicopters, and a yacht, and drive 1,500 miles per year in the car.”  Which means the other 63 cars must be either crap, displays or chauffeur driven. Slogging through L.A. traffic, I would seriously consider selling both my kidneys for just one helicopter.  Three seems a bit, well, hoggish.

Still powered by Bugatti’s iconic eight-litre W16 engine with a power output of 1,500 HP, and 200 lbs more downforce than sibling Chiron, makes the Divo is the sushi knife of the lineup.

With all the suspension work, top speed is limited to an embarrassingly slow 236 mph, and in contrast to the Chiron, there is, sadly, no Top Speed mode.

Bugatti Divo Interior

Bugatti Divo Interior

Bugatti Divo Interior

Bugatti Divo Interior

The series consists of only consist of 40 vehicles. Upon the start of presentations to selected customers, the strictly limited small series, with a price at a tad bit shy of $6 million, sold out immediately.

And the name Divo?

Albert Divo

Albert Divo

The supercar is named after Albert Divo, a French racing driver who was a two-time winner of the famous Targa Florio race on the mountainous roads of Sicily with Bugatti in the late 1920s.

Born in Paris on 24 January 1895 under the name of Albert Eugène Diwo (he called himself Divo later).  A fighter pilot in the First World War, his career as a racing driver started with Sunbeam and Talbot-Darracq in 1919.

When Talbot and Delage retired from racing, Divo joined Bugatti’s works team in 1928. The same year, he won the Targa Florio in Sicily driving a Type 35 B. Divo definitely celebrated his greatest success with Bugatti, whose dominance of the Targa Florio started in 1925. Certainly one of the most arduous of all the endurance races of its time, Bugatti won the race five times in succession with the Type 35. He died in France in 1966.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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About the Author: Dave Miller

Dave Miller drives the fastest, coolest, sexiest cars on the planet. He travels the world uncovering the hidden gems in luxury transportation, meeting the owners, and connecting with extraordinary car enthusiasts. Dave is a member of the Midwest Automotive Media Association and writes for various publications. In addition to DriveWithDave.com, you can follow Dave's adventures via Drive With Dave Facebook, Instagram and Twitter and tune into the Drive with Dave Podcast via iTunes, Stitcher or Soundcloud.

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